Schema Markup Every Business NEEDS to Have on Their Website and HOW to Actually Get It on There

This is a step-by-step guide on how to get the essential Schema markup on your website. I am operating under the assumption that you already are aware of what Schema is and just want to know how you actually get it on your site. If you would like a refresher on what structured data is and the benefits it can provide to your site, you can check out our Schema Markup Refresher and How Schema.org Markup Can Help You Succeed in the Age of Universal Search.

Which Schema Do I Need?

If you have ever tried looking through the Schema.org website, you were probably overwhelmed with how many options there are. If you are just getting your feet wet with structured data, I suggest sticking with schema.org/LocalBusiness and Schema.org/PostalAddress as it is applicable to every business.

How Do I Write the Code?

If you go to schema.org/LocalBusiness and scroll to the bottom you will see a list of examples. You can copy the Microdata from one of those if you see it more fitting to your business than my example, otherwise you can just copy the code below into Google’s Structured Data Testing Tool and replace it with your businesses info. Then click Validate to make sure the code is clean and showing the correct information. Be very careful editing the information since one character out of place can throw the entire code off. Here is an example of local business and postal address schema for Brighthaus. Replace the bolded items with your information. <div style=”display: none”> <div itemscope itemtype=”http://schema.org/LocalBusiness”> <span itemprop=”name”>Brighthaus</span> <div itemprop=”address” itemscope itemtype=”http://schema.org/PostalAddress”> <span itemprop=”streetAddress”>1047 University Ave</span> <span itemprop=”addressLocality”>San Diego</span>, <span itemprop=”addressRegion”>CA</span> <span itemprop=”postalCode”>92103</span> </div> <span itemprop=”telephone”>1-800-605-8913</span> <a itemprop=”url” href=”http://brighthausold2.com.207-244-69-7.creativehaus.com”>brighthausold2.com.207-244-69-7.creativehaus.com</a> </div> </div> You will see my script has an additional line of code at the beginning, which is to make sure the code is hidden and not actually shown on the homepage. Once you have your code, move on to the next step.  

Ok, So Where Do I Put This?

Before you go pasting the code, you should either download the Moz Bar or a Chrome Developer Tool add-on called SchemaDump. It’s not a bad idea to have both because they will show you what Schema is on a given page. I’ve had instances where it shows in SchemaDump and not in the Moz bar, so it is always good to have both. These instructions are for WordPress users, but you can follow the same steps with other CMS’s, however, I have had issues with it not working on some platforms, like WIX.
  1. Navigate to the editor of your homepage and click the “text” option and paste the code at the bottom.
 
  1. Click on preview
  2. Right click on the homepage and click Inspect
  3. If you downloaded SchemaDump you will see it listed as one of your developer tools. If the code was implemented correctly, you will see your information listed under Schematic Data.
   
  1. If you have the Moz bar, you can find it under “Markup”, as shown in the screenshot.
  6. You can then click on “Structured Data Testing Tool” to see which code Google is reading. You will see in the screenshot that Google is reading “Organization, LocalBusiness, and WebSite” on this page. 7. If all looks good, just click publish! Congratulations, you have successfully added structured data to your website and Google will reward you for your hard work. You can essentially replicate this exact same formula now with more advanced markups from Schema.org.
Brighthaus
1047 University Ave San Diego, CA92103
1-800-605-8913 brighthausold2.com.207-244-69-7.creativehaus.com You will see my code has an additional line of code at the beginning, which is to make sure the code is hidden and not actually show up on your homepage. INSERT STRUCTURED DATA TESTING TOOL SCREENSHOT Once you have your code, move on to the next step. Ok, So Where Do I Put This? Before you go pasting the code, you should either download the Moz Bar or a Chrome Developer Tool add-on called SchemaDump. It’s not a bad idea to have both because they will show you what Schema is on a page. I’ve had instances where it shows in Schema Dump and not in the Moz bar, so it is always good to have both. These instructions are for WordPress users, but you can follow the same steps with other CMS’s, however, I have had issues with it not working on some platforms, like WIX. 1. Navigate to the editor of your homepage and click the “text” option and paste the code at the bottom. INSERT SCREENSHOT OF WORDPRESS TEXT 2. Click on preview 3. Right click on the homepage and click Inspect 4. If you downloaded SchemaDump you will see it listed as one of your developer tools INSERT SCREENSHOT OF SCHEMA DUMP 5. If you have the Moz bar, you can find it under “Markup”, as shown in the screenshot. You can then click on “Structured Data Testing Tool” to see which code it is reading. You will in the screenshot that Google is seeing “Organization, LocalBusiness, and WebSite” on this page. INSERT SCREENSHOT OF MOZ BAR 6. If all looks good, just click publish! Congratulations, you have successfully added structured data to your website and Google will reward you for your hard work. You can essentially replicate this exact same formula now with more advanced markups from Schema.org.

Landing Page Mistakes That Are Stopping Your Conversions Dead

You’ve done the market research, looked at endless columns of numbers and data, mapped out the right strategy to market to your target audience, and managed to get your audience to your site. Now the real work starts. Landing pages. (dun dun dun) Nothing can be more rewarding and vexing than creating a landing page for your site that converts well. A good landing page has every element of design, copy, and social working together to tell a narrative that guides the visitor toward your conversion goal. Weaving together that web of magic can be difficult but ultimately rewarding. As much as I’d like to offer you magic to solve your landing page problems, my time at Hogwarts won’t allow me to, but if you manage to avoid these 6 problems that plague most landing pages, you’ll be one step ahead of the herd.

1. A Disconnect Between the Ad and the Landing Page Copy

When you first grab your visitor’s attention, you’re teasing them with the promise of more information. When they click on the ad, they expect to see similar messaging on the landing page. You want to lay a trail of clues for your visitors to follow until they find what they’re looking for. The last thing a visitor wants is to click on your ad, which is promising them something, only to find themselves on a page that doesn’t have the same messaging as the initial ad. Keep things consistent.

2. Wrong Call to Action Color

Each landing page should have one specific objective—one thing that your story is leading them to. The placement and wording of your call to action is important, but we won’t get into that today. We’re going to focus on the coloring. There are many theories out there regarding which color is best for your call to action button, but without testing your market audience, it would be difficult to tell which one works best. There have been many studies showing that there is no “one size fits all” color for calls to action. How the button color fits into the visual hierarchy or structure of the page is critical. The best color for call to action buttons is the one that works for you and converts highest on your site. The key is to test and test often. With that in mind, certain colors do incite certain emotional responses from people.
  • Blue denotes professionalism. Blue is used by financial institutions for the trust it radiates and also by tech firms like Dell to show professionalism.
  • Green is the easiest color for the eye to process. It works well for budget-conscious shoppers. Green is also associated with the word “go.”
  • Orange brings to mind feelings of excitement, enthusiasm, and warmth. Sites like Amazon use orange in their calls to action.

3. Not Explaining Your Purpose Clearly

How much time does it take to figure out what you are offering? If the answer is anything more than “no time at all,” you need to change the messaging of the landing page. If you are offering a service, explain what is included. What makes your service unique? Why are you qualified to offer it? Confusing your visitors with unclear messaging is the easiest way to lose a lead.

4. Top Navigation is Not Removed

There has been some conflicting feelings about having top navigation on all landing pages, but recent studies are helping shed some light on why removing your site’s navigation is so important. Your landing page has one purpose: to drive leads. You want to keep the visitor focused on that purpose, which means that the visitor should only be in one place: that landing page. Nowhere else. A landing page is part of an external sales funnel. It’s intended to generate leads or score conversions, so keep the visitor on your landing page and don’t try to drive them anywhere else.

5. Use of Stock Photos

If you search Google right now, you’ll find dozens of landing pages that use stock photos (and in most cases, the same pictures). Stock photos are cheap and easy to get a hold of. Stock photos also look phony and can reduce your credibility. When a visitor gets to your landing page and sees a smiling young woman with a black headset on, what do you think her first impression will be? The simple solution to this is use images of people directly related to the company. By putting a “real face” on your landing page, you’re communicating value to your visitors and inspiring them to trust you more. Generalized stock photos won’t cut it for you anymore.

6. Your Opt-In Form Requires Too Much Thought

In many things, simple wins over complex. Your contact form should be simple. Hubspot researched 40,000 customers and found that conversion rate improves by almost half when the number of form fields are reduced from four to three. The less information you ask for, the easier it is to take action. In most cases, you don’t need more than an email address, maybe first name and phone number. You can always ask for the rest once you get their contact info. The fewer layers you put between your visitor and you, the better. The great thing about these issues is that, with some elbow grease and moderate amount of work, they can all be solved and potentially lead to better conversions rates.

How to Utilize and Benefit from a Custom 404 Page

 

Photo courtesy of India7 Network

We live with 404 errors. They are that pesky neighbor that always shows up unexpected, and they will always keep coming and coming. It is always recommended to clear 404 site errors from your site when you find them, and more of them will appear, so what do you do? Ignore them? Sweep them under the rug? Or how about turning them into a prosperous opportunity! Ok, so what do I do? It is currently best practice to create an official 404 page on your site for whenever a user runs into them on your site. Google has offered some great advice as far as best practices for these page, and you can read more here. I’m paraphrasing, but here are some of the highlights pulled from there:
  1. Tell visitors that the page they’re looking for can’t be found.
  2. Make sure that your webserver returns an actual 404 HTTP status code.
  3. Be sure to feature a navigation pathway back to your site, like a homepage link, as this will prevent exits, drop-offs and can encourage higher conversions.
  4. Have the same look/feel of your site on your 404 page.
How can I do this? Keeping the above guidelines in mind, there are many different ways that you can create a great 404 page that not only keeps the user experience in tact, but also adds new elements to enhance it. I will break down a couple of ideas for you.
  • Add Some Personality to Your Site!
There are plenty of opportunities in the construction of a website where your business style, personality, and/or humor can truly shine. The 404 page is a great place for this. You can turn the unfortunate event of a page error into something that will put a smile on the user’s face. And remember, a happy consumer will practically already have their wallet out! You can be artistic with your 404 page, like they did here: Or you can be funny with your 404 page, like they did here: Or you can be obvious and to the point, like they did here at Propeller:

Got it. What else should I do?
  • Encourage More Site Engagement!
You can include features on the page that encourage a further action from the user. Examples of these are:
  1. A Search Box – This will give the user an opportunity to look for something specific on your site.
  2. Link to Homepage – when in doubt, send them home. This will reset the user experience and get the user to where they really want to be on your site.
  3. Link to Top Site Pages – You could include links to your homepage, your sitemap, or even include favorite or site pages in the attempt to encourage additional pageviews.
  • Promote Yourself!
Are you trying to push the sale of blue widgets this month? Or trying to get rid of the overstocked fruitcake supply after the holidays? You can use this opportunity to feature promotional items, discounts and seasonal incentives on this page to encourage a purchase or conversion!
  • Make it Your Own!
In conclusion, you can create a great 404 page for your website where both you and your business can truly shine. You can have a better user experience, gain more site traction, and even improve sales or conversions. That’s like having your cake, eating it, and then eating it again! Sound good? Now get to work on your own incredible 404 page! Contributed by: Darryl Blank, SEO Account Manager at BrightHaus